How to Play a Walking Bass Line Like a PRO – Tips, Tricks and Embellishments

Being able to play a walking bass line in your left hand is an important skill if you’re learning jazz piano. It allows you to accompany not only yourself, but others. It’s also central to learning and playing jazz organ as well. This tutorial starts with some beginner concepts, then jumps into more advanced ideas, demonstrating some excellent ways for you to make your basslines sound more authentic and swingin’.

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How to Solo: Jazz Improvisation 101

This jazz piano tutorial demonstrates an excellent exercise to help you learn the essential building blocks of how to improvise, how to solo, and how to apply them to chord changes and harmony. The fundamental technique of jazz improv comes down to learning scales and being able to connect them as chords go by. This lesson will show a beginner how to improvise, but the exercise patterns can also be applied to any difficult song for even an intermediate or advanced student or player to practice and learn.

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How to Sound Like McCoy Tyner – Part 1 – Dominant Pentatonic Voicings

In this short video, you are walked through a specific type of jazz piano voicing often used by the great pianist McCoy Tyner while comping. These voicings are called Dominant Pentatonic Inversions and if you practice the material from this lesson diligently, you will gain much more facility in your Tyner-esque comping abilities every day. Click the link below for a free PDF version of the exercise in half-steps:

Dominant Pentatonic Voicings

Advanced Jazz Comping with Fourth Voicings – Pentatonic Inversions

In this video, I show you how to use the classic Bill Evans “So What” voicing and move it up the Pentatonic scale. It’s a great exercise and will really improve your comping technique giving you new ways to play, especially over modal tunes.

Click here for a PDF of the exercise written out in all keys: Pentatonic Inversions

Advanced Ear Training – Relative Pitch Exercises Part 1

In this video, we will go through some advanced ear training exercises that will train your relative pitch to  a point where you no longer have any trouble learning songs by ear.  Many people do not understand that ear training, just like training any muscle in your body, is a process that requires diligence and persistence. However, in many ways, ear training is also easier than many people think. If music is a language, and music theory is grammar, then ear training is like opening up a dictionary and memorizing words. Learning to hear and remember new sounds is much like memorizing these new words that you are adding to your vocabulary.

The way this exercise works is that we go through a fairly tough series of chords. I give you the starting pitch of “C” and then you have to name the notes in the chord from bottom to top. This is tough ear training, so if you nail this you’re in great shape and you should have no problem learning music by ear!

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